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Getting Preapproved for a Mortgage

Let sellers know you're a serious buyer

A Wells Fargo PriorityBuyer® preapproval makes sellers sit up and take notice.
What's your home financing price range? Don't guess. Get Prequalified

Mortgage preapproval options

Finding a home price range and loan amount you're comfortable with is a good way to start shopping for a home with confidence. And with our free letter options, you can let sellers and real estate agents know you're a serious buyer. 

We have 3 ways you can learn how much you may be able to borrow:


Your free mortgage prequalification lets you know roughly how much you may be able to borrow to buy your new home, using basic financial information you provide. There's no credit check, no charge, and no commitment.


When you get preapproved for a home loan with a PriorityBuyer® preapproval, you'll get an estimate of a loan amount you may qualify for — and a home price range you may want to consider. We check your credit and conduct an initial automated credit review.

Preapprovals are subject to change or cancellation if your requested loan no longer meets applicable regulatory requirements and are not available on all loan products. Speak with your home mortgage consultant for details.

Credit approval

Our highest standard of approval. This means we've checked your credit and you've been credit-approved for a specific amount. Also, an underwriter has reviewed your information and made an initial decision on your application.

Keep in mind these are tools to help you while home shopping, not commitments to lend. You'll need to finalize your mortgage application, and we'll need to verify your information, review your financial documents, and verify the property meets requirements before we can make a final decision on your application.

 Did you know? 

We have the experience to help you find the loan that's right for you. Learn more
Video: Prequalification versus preapproval

Video — Prequalification versus preapproval

Find out more about these two ways of estimating what you may be able to borrow.

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